Company Names: The Ups and Downs of Using Your Personal Name 

by T+B BLOG TEAM on Tuesday, 16 January, 2018

Is it a good idea to name your company after yourself?

A recent New York Times article, “There’s More to Naming a Company After Yourself Than Ego,” took a look at the pros and cons of using your personal name for your company.

Two often-cited examples of successes mentioned in the article are Michael R. Bloomberg, owner of Bloomberg L.P., the financial software and media company and US President Donald Trump’s namesake brand, The Trump Organization, whose name appears on nearly all of his company’s real estate properties.

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Topics: trademark, names

Adding "Blockchain" to Company Names Prompts Stock Surges

by T+B BLOG TEAM on Wednesday, 3 January, 2018

The Long Island Iced Tea Corp. changed its name to Long Blockchain Corp. and guess what happened?

In pre-market trading, according to TechCrunch, its share price jumped as much as 500% before settling back down at 275%. Now the compay's worth about $92 million instead of its previous $23.8 million value. All of this prompted by adding "Blockchain" to its name.

Long Island Iced Tea isn't the first company to jump on the bitcoin craze. Bioptix, a biotech firm, also saw a recent jump in its stock price when it changed its name to Riot Blockchain. CNN Money reports that tobacco company Rich Cigars (now Intercontinental Technology, Inc.) and e-cigarette firm Vapetek's (now Nodechain, Inc.) stock prices shot up after announcing they were becoming blockchain companies. And, according to Payment Week, online retailer Overstock.com, after switching focus to its blockchain operations with the launch of tZERO, a trading system for cryptocurrency, also experienced big stock gains.

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Topics: branding, names

Dunkin’ Donuts Considering Name Change

by T+B BLOG TEAM on Monday, 7 August, 2017

Can you imagine Dunkin’ Donuts without the “Donuts”?! Luckily, that possible change would be in name only.

Yes, donut chain Dunkin’ Donuts is testing the shortened “Dunkin’” name at a few U.S. locations in a move to widen its appeal beyond donuts to coffee, according to Nation’s Restaurant News. CNBC reports that a company statement said: "While we remain the number one retailer of donuts in the country, as part of our efforts to reinforce that Dunkin' Donuts is a beverage-led brand and coffee leader, we will be testing signage in a few locations that refer to the brand simply as 'Dunkin'." The company also has plans to start redesigning its stores.

The company has been referring to itself as Dunkin’ in advertising “for more than a decade, ever since we introduced our ‘America Runs on Dunkin’ campaign,” according to a company statement. A final decision about whether to change the name is expected to be made in late 2018.

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Topics: branding, names

When Naming Goes Public: Trainy McTrainface On Track for Swedish Rail Line

by T+B BLOG TEAM on Friday, 28 July, 2017

Remember Boaty McBoatface? It seems like only yesterday when the name was first floated after the UK’s Natural Environmental Research Council (NERC) asked for help in finding a name for a Royal Research ship via its website and Twitter account. More than 124,000 votes were cast and the winner turned out to be . . . Boaty McBoatface. But the Boaty name was overruled in favor of RRS Sir David Attenborough, but the name remains afloat on the Attenborough as an onboard submersible.

Now following in Boaty’s wake is Sweden’s Trainy McTrainface. Yes, the latest engine on Sweden’s Stockholm-Gothenburg train line has been named Trainy McTrainface, thanks to a public poll run by Swedish rail company MTR Express and a Swedish newspaper, Metro.

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Topics: brands, trademark clearance, names

A Smorgasbord of Recent Geographical Indication News

by T+B BLOG TEAM on Wednesday, 28 June, 2017

The EU has several geographical indications, like PDO (protected designation of origin) PGI (Protected Geographical Indication) that are similar to France’s AOC (appellation d'origine controlee). They all serve to protect the names of food and beverage products that come from a specific area, place, or country, like Champagne, feta cheese, Parma ham, and Cornish pasties.

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Topics: trademarks, names

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The title says it all. This is a blog about trademarks and brands, expanding the expertise and resources you’ve come to expect from Corsearch. From expert research tips to the inside scoop on productivity solutions, join the conversation about trademarks and brands.

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