Steve Anderson

Steve Anderson - Director of Product Management, Trademark Solutions: Ensure the commercial success of Corsearch products and services leveraging product and industry knowledge and a user-based design approach. Years Experience: 24+ Areas of Expertise: Product design and development, trademarks research and prosecution, pharmaceuticals, work-flow automation First job I ever had? Dishwasher at a Greek restaurant when I was 13 years old. One thing that would surprise people most about me: I am a musician (trumpet/sax) and still perform with groups as a hobby 3 things I care about: Technology, trademarks, and creative solutions Sites/Blogs I like: The Great Geek Manual, The Science of Fiction, Weird Warp, and Bad Brand Good Brand

Email: steve.anderson@wolterskluwer.com

Author's Posts

Side Effect Warning: FDA’s “Change of Formulation” to POCA Algorithm May Cause Headaches, Tiredness, and Blurry Vision

by Steve Anderson on Wednesday, 5 April, 2017

Back in late 2016, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a new version of the Phonetic and Orthographic Computer Analysis (POCA) program called POCA 4.0. For those of us in the pharmaceutical trademark clearance and/or branding industries, this sounded like a good thing.

Program version updates come with the expectation of improvement. The original POCA was released years ago, and while not perfect, it remains the pharma industry standard in terms of ranking pharmaceutical marks on name safety similarity to a proposed candidate. POCA isn’t a definitive tool, and it’s just one of many methods and tools in the FDA’s arsenal for determining name safety issues in the pharmaceutical industry.

The POCA 4.0 algorithm has indeed been dramatically changed from the original pre-4.0 version. According to the FDA, the orthographic component of the POCA algorithm was revised to better capture errors that are being reported due to the increased use of electronic prescribing. The algorithm has been revised to put more emphasis on the similarity that occurs at the beginning of a name — especially the first three letters and on exact letter matches — and also to emphasize where names share letters that are not consecutive.

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Topics: trademark, pharmaceuticals

‘Are You Experienced’? Jimi Hendrix Estate in Trademark Dispute With Family Member, Again

by Steve Anderson on Tuesday, 28 March, 2017

Jimi Hendrix hasn’t been on the Forbes list of Top-Earning Dead Celebrities for several years (he nearly made the cut in 2015), but that doesn’t mean the musician’s estate isn’t still earning big money and staying busy to protect its IP.

Recently, two companies that were founded by Hendrix’s estate — Experience Hendrix LLC and Authentic Hendrix LLC — filed a trademark and copyright infringement suit in US District Court against Hendrix’s own brother, Leon, and another individual.

The lawsuit claims that Leon Hendrix and Andrew Pitsicalis were selling Hendrix-themed cannabis, food, and alcohol, including “Jimi’s Cannabis Collection: Purple Haze” and “Jimi’s Wines” for “their own personal gain” through a company called Purple Haze Properties LLC.

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Topics: trademark

Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville Quashes Marijuanaville Trademark

by Steve Anderson on Tuesday, 21 March, 2017

Rachel A. Bevis had applied to the USPTO to register a trademark for “Marijuanaville” in International Class 25 (t-shirts, hats, sweatshirts, sweat pants, jackets, etc.) and International Class 35 (drive-through retail store services, retail apparel stores, and retail clothing stores).

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Topics: trademark

Soundcloud Moves to Shut Down Account for Trademark Infringement

by Steve Anderson on Friday, 17 March, 2017

Here’s an interesting story involving a claim of trademark infringement on social media, via Techdirt.

Digital/music strategic Bas Grasmayer, who has written for Techdirt, opened his Soundcloud account way back in 2008 or 2009. Because it was the early days of the audio distribution platform, Grasmayer was lucky to snag an account that featured just his first name — soundcloud.com/bas/.Lucky, until recently, when Grasmeyer received notification from Soundcloud that the use of “Bas” in his account URL was infringing on a trademark (note: of rapper Bas, a/k/a Abbas Hamad). Soundcloud requested that Grasmeyer change his URL and display name to eliminate the mention of “Bas.” Yes, eliminate your name.

In addition, the notification from Soundcloud’s “Trust & Safety Team” informed Grasmeyer that he had 48 hours to make the change or risk account suspension “on the grounds of trademark infringement.”

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Topics: trademark, social media

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The title says it all. This is a blog about trademarks and brands, expanding the expertise and resources you’ve come to expect from Corsearch. From expert research tips to the inside scoop on productivity solutions, join the conversation about trademarks and brands.

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